ECCC

Celebrating International Justice Day 2015 in Cambodia #JusticeMatters

17 July is widely known as International Justice Day.  It celebrates the anniversary of the adoption of the Rome Statute, the treaty that established the International Criminal Court (ICC) in 1998. As of today, 123 States signed the Rome Statute thus recognizing the importance and the necessity of an independent and permanent International Criminal Court. The ICC is the first permanent international tribunal that has jurisdiction to prosecute individuals for the gravest crimes: war crimes, genocide and crime against humanity. Since 11 April 2002, Cambodia is a Member to the Rome Statute, being one of the few Asian States to agree to the international criminal law principles. It signaled the government’s commitment to uphold the principles of justice protected by the Statute.     ...

ECCC: International Co-Prosecutor Andrew Cayley resigns

Andrew Cayley, an international criminal lawyer who has acted for the Defence and Prosecution at the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (“ICTY”), International Criminal Court (“ICC”), Special Court for Sierra Leone (“SCSL”) and most recently the Extraordinary Chambers in the Courts of Cambodia (“ECCC”), has resigned from his post at the ECCC, citing personal reasons for his departure. He served as Chief International Co-Prosecutor of the ECCC, the Khmer Rouge Tribunal, based in Phnom Penh. He was nominated to this position by the Secretary General of the United Nations, Ban Ki – moon, on 18 August 2009, and appointed by the King of Cambodia, His Majesty King Norodom Sihamoni, to be Chief International Co- Prosecut...

Civil Parties’ Statements of Suffering at the ECCC

In national systems of criminal procedure that recognize Civil Parties, they express their suffering as their testimony proceeds. At the Extraordinary Chambers in the Courts of Cambodia (ECCC) however, the first fifteen Civil Parties who came to testify in the first trial of Case 002, from the end of December 2011 to the middle of May 2013, were only allowed to discuss their suffering after the other parties had finished asking them questions on the facts at issue. The President of the Trial Chamber notably required Civil Party Lawyers to avoid questions about suffering. Only after they finished their testimony were the Civil Parties allocated time that was specifically dedicated to the expression of their suffering. Isolating the Civil Party’s statement of suffering from his or her testim...