freedom of expression

The UN Human Rights Committee raises serious concerns about the full implementation of freedom of expression and political participation in Kazakhstan

Geneva 23 June 2016 – On 22 and 23 June 2016 the UN Human Rights Committee – the body that monitors the implementation of the rights enshrined in the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights (ICCPR) – reviewed for the second time since Kazakhstan is a party to the ICCPR the status of civil and political rights in the country. The Government of Kazakhstan submitted its initial periodic report to the Committee in 2009 and was reviewed in 2011. Already at that time, the UN experts expressed concerns about the Government’s failure to implement the right to freedom of expression pretected under Article 19 of the ICCPR. The experts recommended Kazakhstan “to review its legislation on defamation and insults to ensure that it fully complies with the provis...

The Open Dialog Foundation and Destination Justice bring international attention to violations of freedom of expression in Kazakhstan

On 22-23 June 2016, the UN Human Rights Committee will consider the implementation of Kazakhstan’s obligations under the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights (ICCPR).  Destination Justice and the Open Dialog Foundation presented the Committee with a report in which they drew the Committee’s attention to the gross violations in Kazakhstan of freedom of expression and dissemination of information – rights protected under the Covenant. Through the use of oppressive policies and legislations, Kazakhstan has unjustifiably restricted the right to freedom of expression and information of journalists, lawyers, human rights defenders and critics of the government and its representatives. By doing so, Kazakhstan has undermines the  essence of the right and violated ...

Training Workshop on Ways to Defend Defamation and Incitement Charges

[br] Destination Justice, in partnership with the East West Management Institute, is currently facilitating a series of training workshops for lawyers who provide legal aid services as part of Cambodia’s fledgling legal aid community. The three one-day workshops are designed to generate discussion about major issues lawyers face representing clients and to provide practical skills training to develop capacity for lawyers to represent clients in court. [br] On 27 June, Destination Justice consultants Natalie Matranga and Madeleine Forster hosted the second workshop titled: techniques to defend journalists, human rights defenders and members of community sector organisations. This session built on the first workshop, hosted on 31 May, which explored defence strategies to assist victims of hu...

Protesting without permission: A brief analysis of freedom of assembly laws in Cambodia

In the wake of Cambodia’s contested election results, public gatherings and demonstrations have become increasingly common. The most recent discourse in this area has identified a lack of clarity regarding what constitutes a demonstration according to the law, when permission is needed from local authorities and when simple notification will suffice.  This briefing note takes a look at what the Law on Peaceful Demonstration 2009 provides, and whether it stands consistently with international norms. 1. What constitutes a demonstration? The Law on Peaceful Demonstration (“the Law”), enacted in December 2009, sets out the procedure for obtaining permission for all “peaceful gatherings or marches for demonstration in the Kingdom of Cambodia”, and the measures demonstration organisers must take...