Human rights

Revealing the Rainbow: The Human Rights Situation of LGBTIQ HRDs in SEA

Phnom Penh, 16 May 2018 Destination Justice is proud to launch its new report Revealing the Rainbow: The Human Rights Situation of LGBTIQ HRDs in Southeast Asia at the Royal University of Phnom Penh (RUPP) with the collaboration of Rainbow Community Kampuchea (RoCK), and the support of OHCHR-Cambodia and the Embassy of Sweden in Cambodia. The launch aims to engage government representatives in a dialogue to strengthen the social inclusiveness and the legal protection of the LGBTIQ in Cambodia, and in Southeast Asia. Destination Justice, through our Rainbow Justice Project, aims to foster dialogue in Southeast Asia on sexual orientation, gender identity and gender expression, and sexual characteristics (SOGIESC), and to provide advocacy tools to changemakers for the promotion and protection...

International Law Protections for Minority Groups’ Right to Self-Identify

International law protects minority groups' right to self-identify in several key ways, confirms a new briefing paper released by Destination Justice today, "International Law on Minorities' Right to Self-Identify". The briefing paper explains that minority group protections stem from one core international law principle that states are prohibited from discriminating against a person on the basis of their race, colour, sex, language, religion, political or other opinion, national or social origin, property, birth or other status.

Release of the Guide to Human Rights for LGBTQ in Cambodia

The ‘Guide to Human Rights for LGBTQ in Cambodia’, a collaboration between Destination Justice and Rainbow Community Kampuchea (RoCK), has been released on 10 December 2015, and is now available online in English and in Khmer. The guide is available on chbab.net in English and in Khmer.

Celebrating International Justice Day 2015 in Cambodia #JusticeMatters

17 July is widely known as International Justice Day.  It celebrates the anniversary of the adoption of the Rome Statute, the treaty that established the International Criminal Court (ICC) in 1998. As of today, 123 States signed the Rome Statute thus recognizing the importance and the necessity of an independent and permanent International Criminal Court. The ICC is the first permanent international tribunal that has jurisdiction to prosecute individuals for the gravest crimes: war crimes, genocide and crime against humanity. Since 11 April 2002, Cambodia is a Member to the Rome Statute, being one of the few Asian States to agree to the international criminal law principles. It signaled the government’s commitment to uphold the principles of justice protected by the Statute.     ...

KAS’s Law Talk March 2015: Cambodian Constitution Law – Implications for State Organisation and Basic Rights

Upon Konrad-Adenauer Stiftung (KAS)’s invitation, around 30 Cambodian and International legal experts gathered last weekend in Sihanoukville to debate constitutional and rule of law reforms in Cambodia. This forum had two main objectives. The first one was to discuss the “Electoral, Parliamentary and Political Party Reform” as well as basic constitutional rights, their international foundations and legal enforcement in Cambodia. A special focus was given on the second day on the analysis of the newly adopted Electoral Law which was explained from the CPP’s perspective by H.E. Sik Bunhok, the CNRP’s perspective by H.E. Yem Ponhearith, and the civil society’s perspective by COMFREL.   The second objective for KAS was to gather the authors of the soon-to-be published “Handbook on the Dev...

CCHR: 5 short movies to raise awareness on Cambodia’s land rights crisis

On Wednesday 17 December 2014 late afternoon, the Cambodian Center for Human Rights (CCHR) launched its new project before an assembly of around 80 people including  the EU representative, Virginie Lafleur Tighe, members of the city hall and the national assembly, members of the civil society, and representatives of the communities affected by the land crisis (including the five community leaders interviewed in the movies). This project  is part of CCHR Land Reform Project and consists of a series of community profiles highlighting Cambodia’s land rights crisis. It consists -for now- of a series of 5 short movies screening communities struggling with a land issue -the objective being 30 by 2017. The films tell different stories of harassment, intimidation and attacks, in attempts to chase ...

Training Workshop on Ways to Defend Defamation and Incitement Charges

[br] Destination Justice, in partnership with the East West Management Institute, is currently facilitating a series of training workshops for lawyers who provide legal aid services as part of Cambodia’s fledgling legal aid community. The three one-day workshops are designed to generate discussion about major issues lawyers face representing clients and to provide practical skills training to develop capacity for lawyers to represent clients in court. [br] On 27 June, Destination Justice consultants Natalie Matranga and Madeleine Forster hosted the second workshop titled: techniques to defend journalists, human rights defenders and members of community sector organisations. This session built on the first workshop, hosted on 31 May, which explored defence strategies to assist victims of hu...

Training Workshop on Defence Techniques to Assist Victims of Human Rights and Political Abuses

Professional development for lawyers is vital to enhance legal advocacy and promote the development of the rule of law in post-conflict nations such as Cambodia. Today, only a small number of lawyers provide free of charge legal aid services to Cambodians in need of legal assistance. On 31 May, Destination Justice led a hands-on, interactive training workshop for Cambodian legal aid lawyers on Defence Techniques to Assist Victims of Human Rights and Political Abuses with the support of the East West Management Institute (EWMI) and USAID.

Cambodia: Does the boycott of CNRP seats in the Assembly amount to a forfeiture?

The CNRP has threatened to boycott the National Assembly over allegations of irregularities and inaccuracies in the reporting of the election results on 28 July, but Prime Minister Hun Sen has warned the main opposition party that they will forfeit their seats if they carry out such a threat.  But is Hun Sen’s warning constitutionally possible? What are the possibilities if a party refuses to take their seats in Parliament? What would be the impact of the boycott to the functioning of the Assembly? According to Article 76, the National Assembly must consist of at least 120 members, however there is no other provision which stipulates that the National Assembly cannot be held if their members number below 120. This was illustrated in 2008, when the opposition party also boycotted the first ...

Civil Parties’ Statements of Suffering at the ECCC

In national systems of criminal procedure that recognize Civil Parties, they express their suffering as their testimony proceeds. At the Extraordinary Chambers in the Courts of Cambodia (ECCC) however, the first fifteen Civil Parties who came to testify in the first trial of Case 002, from the end of December 2011 to the middle of May 2013, were only allowed to discuss their suffering after the other parties had finished asking them questions on the facts at issue. The President of the Trial Chamber notably required Civil Party Lawyers to avoid questions about suffering. Only after they finished their testimony were the Civil Parties allocated time that was specifically dedicated to the expression of their suffering. Isolating the Civil Party’s statement of suffering from his or her testim...