International Humanitarian Law

Civil Parties’ Statements of Suffering at the ECCC

In national systems of criminal procedure that recognize Civil Parties, they express their suffering as their testimony proceeds. At the Extraordinary Chambers in the Courts of Cambodia (ECCC) however, the first fifteen Civil Parties who came to testify in the first trial of Case 002, from the end of December 2011 to the middle of May 2013, were only allowed to discuss their suffering after the other parties had finished asking them questions on the facts at issue. The President of the Trial Chamber notably required Civil Party Lawyers to avoid questions about suffering. Only after they finished their testimony were the Civil Parties allocated time that was specifically dedicated to the expression of their suffering. Isolating the Civil Party’s statement of suffering from his or her testim...

First Participation of International Relations students in Moot Court Competition in Cambodia

The weekend of the 10th and 11th of November, four International Relations program’s students coached by Destination Justice’s consultants participated for the first time in the International Committee of the Red Cross Moot Court Competition annually held at the Royal University of Law and Economics for the last ten years. Ieng Sengheng (22), Lay Daro (22), Lek Sothy (21) and Lim Sreynith (21), soon-to-be the first graduates from the International Relations program trained intensively for three weeks as part of Destination Justice’s Legal Higher Education Assistance program. The International Relations program is the first pilot education program where Destination Justice’s consultants are involved. In addition to the International Humanitarian Law course taught by Céline Martin, the four ...