United Nations

Destination Justice welcomes the UN Human Rights Council adoption of a Resolution for an Independent Expert on Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity

Geneva, 4 July 2016 – On 30 June 2016 the UN Human Rights Council, in its 32nd session, passed a ground-breaking resolution that will establish the first global-level Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transexual (LGBT) monitor in the form of an Independent Expert on Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity.  Through this historic appointment, the UN Human Rights Council (HRC) reaffirms its commitment to eradicating violence and discrimination against LGBT people around the world. The resolution was introduced by the core seven Latin American countries and received support from more than 600 civil society organisations.  Among the HRC members, 23 states voted in favour of the resolution, 18 against with 6 abstaining. While this is not the first HRC resolution addressing sexual orientation and...

The Universal Periodic Review of Cambodia. The Beginning of a Second Cycle of Progress in the Country?

On January 28, outside the Palais des Nations in Geneva, gathering Cambodian nationals demanded for the respect of human rights in their country, inside the Palais, before the United Nations Human Rights Council (UN HRC), the representatives of the Royal Government of Cambodia presented the progress achieved in the field of human rights to 76 fellow diplomats, civil society organizations, and other observers. H.E. Mr. Mak Sambath, Vice Chair of the National Human Rights Committee, headed the Cambodian delegation in Geneva and introduced the national report drafted under the auspices of the Universal Periodic Review (UPR).  The report documented the progress Cambodia has made in the areas of lands rights, rule of law, torture, the conditions of prisons and rehabilitation centers, socio-econ...

Civil Parties’ Statements of Suffering at the ECCC

In national systems of criminal procedure that recognize Civil Parties, they express their suffering as their testimony proceeds. At the Extraordinary Chambers in the Courts of Cambodia (ECCC) however, the first fifteen Civil Parties who came to testify in the first trial of Case 002, from the end of December 2011 to the middle of May 2013, were only allowed to discuss their suffering after the other parties had finished asking them questions on the facts at issue. The President of the Trial Chamber notably required Civil Party Lawyers to avoid questions about suffering. Only after they finished their testimony were the Civil Parties allocated time that was specifically dedicated to the expression of their suffering. Isolating the Civil Party’s statement of suffering from his or her testim...